Stepping into System Change with SC2.0: A Case Study

On this episode of the Frayme podcast... we welcome Paula Galenzoski from Youth Hubs Alberta in the second part of the episode for a case study, where we unpack what her experience was like working with SC2.0 to implement services in youth hubs across Alberta, and the ongoing benefits it has had on these communities.
www.frayme.ca

'No bee is left behind' at the Hive - LakelandToday.ca

There's a buzz around town about the new youth facility coming to Bonnyville. Teens and young adults throughout the Lakeland region will have access to the Hive in the New Year....
www.lakelandtoday.ca

The Bridge wellness hub unveils new Indigenous art installations and Spiritual Space

On Wednesday, July 24, The Bridge Wellness Hub for Youth unveiled new art installations and a dedicated spiritual space for spiritual reflection and cultural… www.fortsaskatchewanrecord.com

Youth Hub set to open Fall 2021

WBIYN creates a safe space for youth to cope with mental health…
www.ymmparent.ca

About the Canadian Mental Health Association, Alberta Division

For more than 60 years, the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA), Alberta Division has focused on recovery and support for Albertans impacted by mental illness. CMHA, Alberta Division stands with Albertans within their communities as they achieve their wellness goals. Hundreds of CMHA, Alberta Division staff and volunteers engage clients in activities, assisting with navigation of the complex matrix of mental health services. CMHA, Alberta Division works to increase and enhance individuals’, groups’ and communities’ control over their mental health.

Land Acknowledgement

Tansi — Cree | Oki — Blackfoot | ​Aba washded — Stoney (Nakota) | ​Ɂedlanet’e — Dene
We respectfully acknowledge that we are on the traditional lands and territories of Indigenous people in Alberta. Generations from past, present and future. In doing so, we want to recognize the significance of our relationships with the land and the peoples who call this ‘home.’ As we reflect on supporting community design in the Youth Mental Health Hubs initiative, we will engage and embrace the teachings we are gifted from the first peoples regarding the history and connection to the land. As treaty people, we commit to a reciprocal relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous worldviews that honour and respect ways of knowing and being, ones that can be reflected and supported with the communities in building strong foundations for all youth and families to learn, work and play.